Volcano National Park, South Point & Green Sand Beach.
This weekend, Amira, Ashley, Sam & I adventured once again—our first stop, Hawaii Volcano National Park. We camped overnight in the primitive camping area which was essentially barren wasteland. Because it was so windy and arid, we were not allowed to have a campfire. To make up for its lack of pyro-capabilities, our campsite had a really neat view of the glowing volcano crater & lack of light pollution made for incredible stargazing! 
The next day, we drove around the park down to the coastline and saw some not-so-steamy steam vents before heading to the SOUTHERN-MOST POINT IN THE US! When we reached southpoint, we thought we saw people fishing for sharks—turns out they were just fishing for whatever would bite and the crowd surrounding them was actually a group of teens cliff-jumping. We weren’t able to muster up the bravery to make the leap off the southern-most point in the US but still managed to snag a touristy picture with a sign to prove we had been there. 
Next, we headed to Green Sand Beach--only a left turn and five minute drive away! What they don’t tell you before reaching this destination is that you have to hike 3-4miles along the coast to get there and there was no way we could drive along this rocky terrain without a hefty truck. Lucky for us we grabbed a ride with a local named James whose family has lived in the area for TEN generations. When we finally arrived, the view below was absolutely stunning. Amira took the panorama of the beach with her iPhone that you see can above. We had to climb down to the beach, but there was a pathway as well as ladders to help us get there. The sand was more of an olive green with a gold tint to it. There are only two Green Sand Beaches in the world: one in the Big Island and the other is in the Galapagos! It was probably tied with Mauna Kea for my favorite trips in Hawaii. 
Before leaving, we stopped at the “Southernmost Restaurant and Bar” in the US. The food wasn’t incredible but it was a neat experience. On the drive back, we made some unexpected friends…yep, that’s a zebra!!
  Volcano National Park, South Point & Green Sand Beach.
This weekend, Amira, Ashley, Sam & I adventured once again—our first stop, Hawaii Volcano National Park. We camped overnight in the primitive camping area which was essentially barren wasteland. Because it was so windy and arid, we were not allowed to have a campfire. To make up for its lack of pyro-capabilities, our campsite had a really neat view of the glowing volcano crater & lack of light pollution made for incredible stargazing! 
The next day, we drove around the park down to the coastline and saw some not-so-steamy steam vents before heading to the SOUTHERN-MOST POINT IN THE US! When we reached southpoint, we thought we saw people fishing for sharks—turns out they were just fishing for whatever would bite and the crowd surrounding them was actually a group of teens cliff-jumping. We weren’t able to muster up the bravery to make the leap off the southern-most point in the US but still managed to snag a touristy picture with a sign to prove we had been there. 
Next, we headed to Green Sand Beach--only a left turn and five minute drive away! What they don’t tell you before reaching this destination is that you have to hike 3-4miles along the coast to get there and there was no way we could drive along this rocky terrain without a hefty truck. Lucky for us we grabbed a ride with a local named James whose family has lived in the area for TEN generations. When we finally arrived, the view below was absolutely stunning. Amira took the panorama of the beach with her iPhone that you see can above. We had to climb down to the beach, but there was a pathway as well as ladders to help us get there. The sand was more of an olive green with a gold tint to it. There are only two Green Sand Beaches in the world: one in the Big Island and the other is in the Galapagos! It was probably tied with Mauna Kea for my favorite trips in Hawaii. 
Before leaving, we stopped at the “Southernmost Restaurant and Bar” in the US. The food wasn’t incredible but it was a neat experience. On the drive back, we made some unexpected friends…yep, that’s a zebra!!
  Volcano National Park, South Point & Green Sand Beach.
This weekend, Amira, Ashley, Sam & I adventured once again—our first stop, Hawaii Volcano National Park. We camped overnight in the primitive camping area which was essentially barren wasteland. Because it was so windy and arid, we were not allowed to have a campfire. To make up for its lack of pyro-capabilities, our campsite had a really neat view of the glowing volcano crater & lack of light pollution made for incredible stargazing! 
The next day, we drove around the park down to the coastline and saw some not-so-steamy steam vents before heading to the SOUTHERN-MOST POINT IN THE US! When we reached southpoint, we thought we saw people fishing for sharks—turns out they were just fishing for whatever would bite and the crowd surrounding them was actually a group of teens cliff-jumping. We weren’t able to muster up the bravery to make the leap off the southern-most point in the US but still managed to snag a touristy picture with a sign to prove we had been there. 
Next, we headed to Green Sand Beach--only a left turn and five minute drive away! What they don’t tell you before reaching this destination is that you have to hike 3-4miles along the coast to get there and there was no way we could drive along this rocky terrain without a hefty truck. Lucky for us we grabbed a ride with a local named James whose family has lived in the area for TEN generations. When we finally arrived, the view below was absolutely stunning. Amira took the panorama of the beach with her iPhone that you see can above. We had to climb down to the beach, but there was a pathway as well as ladders to help us get there. The sand was more of an olive green with a gold tint to it. There are only two Green Sand Beaches in the world: one in the Big Island and the other is in the Galapagos! It was probably tied with Mauna Kea for my favorite trips in Hawaii. 
Before leaving, we stopped at the “Southernmost Restaurant and Bar” in the US. The food wasn’t incredible but it was a neat experience. On the drive back, we made some unexpected friends…yep, that’s a zebra!!
  Volcano National Park, South Point & Green Sand Beach.
This weekend, Amira, Ashley, Sam & I adventured once again—our first stop, Hawaii Volcano National Park. We camped overnight in the primitive camping area which was essentially barren wasteland. Because it was so windy and arid, we were not allowed to have a campfire. To make up for its lack of pyro-capabilities, our campsite had a really neat view of the glowing volcano crater & lack of light pollution made for incredible stargazing! 
The next day, we drove around the park down to the coastline and saw some not-so-steamy steam vents before heading to the SOUTHERN-MOST POINT IN THE US! When we reached southpoint, we thought we saw people fishing for sharks—turns out they were just fishing for whatever would bite and the crowd surrounding them was actually a group of teens cliff-jumping. We weren’t able to muster up the bravery to make the leap off the southern-most point in the US but still managed to snag a touristy picture with a sign to prove we had been there. 
Next, we headed to Green Sand Beach--only a left turn and five minute drive away! What they don’t tell you before reaching this destination is that you have to hike 3-4miles along the coast to get there and there was no way we could drive along this rocky terrain without a hefty truck. Lucky for us we grabbed a ride with a local named James whose family has lived in the area for TEN generations. When we finally arrived, the view below was absolutely stunning. Amira took the panorama of the beach with her iPhone that you see can above. We had to climb down to the beach, but there was a pathway as well as ladders to help us get there. The sand was more of an olive green with a gold tint to it. There are only two Green Sand Beaches in the world: one in the Big Island and the other is in the Galapagos! It was probably tied with Mauna Kea for my favorite trips in Hawaii. 
Before leaving, we stopped at the “Southernmost Restaurant and Bar” in the US. The food wasn’t incredible but it was a neat experience. On the drive back, we made some unexpected friends…yep, that’s a zebra!!
  Volcano National Park, South Point & Green Sand Beach.
This weekend, Amira, Ashley, Sam & I adventured once again—our first stop, Hawaii Volcano National Park. We camped overnight in the primitive camping area which was essentially barren wasteland. Because it was so windy and arid, we were not allowed to have a campfire. To make up for its lack of pyro-capabilities, our campsite had a really neat view of the glowing volcano crater & lack of light pollution made for incredible stargazing! 
The next day, we drove around the park down to the coastline and saw some not-so-steamy steam vents before heading to the SOUTHERN-MOST POINT IN THE US! When we reached southpoint, we thought we saw people fishing for sharks—turns out they were just fishing for whatever would bite and the crowd surrounding them was actually a group of teens cliff-jumping. We weren’t able to muster up the bravery to make the leap off the southern-most point in the US but still managed to snag a touristy picture with a sign to prove we had been there. 
Next, we headed to Green Sand Beach--only a left turn and five minute drive away! What they don’t tell you before reaching this destination is that you have to hike 3-4miles along the coast to get there and there was no way we could drive along this rocky terrain without a hefty truck. Lucky for us we grabbed a ride with a local named James whose family has lived in the area for TEN generations. When we finally arrived, the view below was absolutely stunning. Amira took the panorama of the beach with her iPhone that you see can above. We had to climb down to the beach, but there was a pathway as well as ladders to help us get there. The sand was more of an olive green with a gold tint to it. There are only two Green Sand Beaches in the world: one in the Big Island and the other is in the Galapagos! It was probably tied with Mauna Kea for my favorite trips in Hawaii. 
Before leaving, we stopped at the “Southernmost Restaurant and Bar” in the US. The food wasn’t incredible but it was a neat experience. On the drive back, we made some unexpected friends…yep, that’s a zebra!!
  Volcano National Park, South Point & Green Sand Beach.
This weekend, Amira, Ashley, Sam & I adventured once again—our first stop, Hawaii Volcano National Park. We camped overnight in the primitive camping area which was essentially barren wasteland. Because it was so windy and arid, we were not allowed to have a campfire. To make up for its lack of pyro-capabilities, our campsite had a really neat view of the glowing volcano crater & lack of light pollution made for incredible stargazing! 
The next day, we drove around the park down to the coastline and saw some not-so-steamy steam vents before heading to the SOUTHERN-MOST POINT IN THE US! When we reached southpoint, we thought we saw people fishing for sharks—turns out they were just fishing for whatever would bite and the crowd surrounding them was actually a group of teens cliff-jumping. We weren’t able to muster up the bravery to make the leap off the southern-most point in the US but still managed to snag a touristy picture with a sign to prove we had been there. 
Next, we headed to Green Sand Beach--only a left turn and five minute drive away! What they don’t tell you before reaching this destination is that you have to hike 3-4miles along the coast to get there and there was no way we could drive along this rocky terrain without a hefty truck. Lucky for us we grabbed a ride with a local named James whose family has lived in the area for TEN generations. When we finally arrived, the view below was absolutely stunning. Amira took the panorama of the beach with her iPhone that you see can above. We had to climb down to the beach, but there was a pathway as well as ladders to help us get there. The sand was more of an olive green with a gold tint to it. There are only two Green Sand Beaches in the world: one in the Big Island and the other is in the Galapagos! It was probably tied with Mauna Kea for my favorite trips in Hawaii. 
Before leaving, we stopped at the “Southernmost Restaurant and Bar” in the US. The food wasn’t incredible but it was a neat experience. On the drive back, we made some unexpected friends…yep, that’s a zebra!!
  Volcano National Park, South Point & Green Sand Beach.
This weekend, Amira, Ashley, Sam & I adventured once again—our first stop, Hawaii Volcano National Park. We camped overnight in the primitive camping area which was essentially barren wasteland. Because it was so windy and arid, we were not allowed to have a campfire. To make up for its lack of pyro-capabilities, our campsite had a really neat view of the glowing volcano crater & lack of light pollution made for incredible stargazing! 
The next day, we drove around the park down to the coastline and saw some not-so-steamy steam vents before heading to the SOUTHERN-MOST POINT IN THE US! When we reached southpoint, we thought we saw people fishing for sharks—turns out they were just fishing for whatever would bite and the crowd surrounding them was actually a group of teens cliff-jumping. We weren’t able to muster up the bravery to make the leap off the southern-most point in the US but still managed to snag a touristy picture with a sign to prove we had been there. 
Next, we headed to Green Sand Beach--only a left turn and five minute drive away! What they don’t tell you before reaching this destination is that you have to hike 3-4miles along the coast to get there and there was no way we could drive along this rocky terrain without a hefty truck. Lucky for us we grabbed a ride with a local named James whose family has lived in the area for TEN generations. When we finally arrived, the view below was absolutely stunning. Amira took the panorama of the beach with her iPhone that you see can above. We had to climb down to the beach, but there was a pathway as well as ladders to help us get there. The sand was more of an olive green with a gold tint to it. There are only two Green Sand Beaches in the world: one in the Big Island and the other is in the Galapagos! It was probably tied with Mauna Kea for my favorite trips in Hawaii. 
Before leaving, we stopped at the “Southernmost Restaurant and Bar” in the US. The food wasn’t incredible but it was a neat experience. On the drive back, we made some unexpected friends…yep, that’s a zebra!!
  Volcano National Park, South Point & Green Sand Beach.
This weekend, Amira, Ashley, Sam & I adventured once again—our first stop, Hawaii Volcano National Park. We camped overnight in the primitive camping area which was essentially barren wasteland. Because it was so windy and arid, we were not allowed to have a campfire. To make up for its lack of pyro-capabilities, our campsite had a really neat view of the glowing volcano crater & lack of light pollution made for incredible stargazing! 
The next day, we drove around the park down to the coastline and saw some not-so-steamy steam vents before heading to the SOUTHERN-MOST POINT IN THE US! When we reached southpoint, we thought we saw people fishing for sharks—turns out they were just fishing for whatever would bite and the crowd surrounding them was actually a group of teens cliff-jumping. We weren’t able to muster up the bravery to make the leap off the southern-most point in the US but still managed to snag a touristy picture with a sign to prove we had been there. 
Next, we headed to Green Sand Beach--only a left turn and five minute drive away! What they don’t tell you before reaching this destination is that you have to hike 3-4miles along the coast to get there and there was no way we could drive along this rocky terrain without a hefty truck. Lucky for us we grabbed a ride with a local named James whose family has lived in the area for TEN generations. When we finally arrived, the view below was absolutely stunning. Amira took the panorama of the beach with her iPhone that you see can above. We had to climb down to the beach, but there was a pathway as well as ladders to help us get there. The sand was more of an olive green with a gold tint to it. There are only two Green Sand Beaches in the world: one in the Big Island and the other is in the Galapagos! It was probably tied with Mauna Kea for my favorite trips in Hawaii. 
Before leaving, we stopped at the “Southernmost Restaurant and Bar” in the US. The food wasn’t incredible but it was a neat experience. On the drive back, we made some unexpected friends…yep, that’s a zebra!!
  Volcano National Park, South Point & Green Sand Beach.
This weekend, Amira, Ashley, Sam & I adventured once again—our first stop, Hawaii Volcano National Park. We camped overnight in the primitive camping area which was essentially barren wasteland. Because it was so windy and arid, we were not allowed to have a campfire. To make up for its lack of pyro-capabilities, our campsite had a really neat view of the glowing volcano crater & lack of light pollution made for incredible stargazing! 
The next day, we drove around the park down to the coastline and saw some not-so-steamy steam vents before heading to the SOUTHERN-MOST POINT IN THE US! When we reached southpoint, we thought we saw people fishing for sharks—turns out they were just fishing for whatever would bite and the crowd surrounding them was actually a group of teens cliff-jumping. We weren’t able to muster up the bravery to make the leap off the southern-most point in the US but still managed to snag a touristy picture with a sign to prove we had been there. 
Next, we headed to Green Sand Beach--only a left turn and five minute drive away! What they don’t tell you before reaching this destination is that you have to hike 3-4miles along the coast to get there and there was no way we could drive along this rocky terrain without a hefty truck. Lucky for us we grabbed a ride with a local named James whose family has lived in the area for TEN generations. When we finally arrived, the view below was absolutely stunning. Amira took the panorama of the beach with her iPhone that you see can above. We had to climb down to the beach, but there was a pathway as well as ladders to help us get there. The sand was more of an olive green with a gold tint to it. There are only two Green Sand Beaches in the world: one in the Big Island and the other is in the Galapagos! It was probably tied with Mauna Kea for my favorite trips in Hawaii. 
Before leaving, we stopped at the “Southernmost Restaurant and Bar” in the US. The food wasn’t incredible but it was a neat experience. On the drive back, we made some unexpected friends…yep, that’s a zebra!!
  Volcano National Park, South Point & Green Sand Beach.
This weekend, Amira, Ashley, Sam & I adventured once again—our first stop, Hawaii Volcano National Park. We camped overnight in the primitive camping area which was essentially barren wasteland. Because it was so windy and arid, we were not allowed to have a campfire. To make up for its lack of pyro-capabilities, our campsite had a really neat view of the glowing volcano crater & lack of light pollution made for incredible stargazing! 
The next day, we drove around the park down to the coastline and saw some not-so-steamy steam vents before heading to the SOUTHERN-MOST POINT IN THE US! When we reached southpoint, we thought we saw people fishing for sharks—turns out they were just fishing for whatever would bite and the crowd surrounding them was actually a group of teens cliff-jumping. We weren’t able to muster up the bravery to make the leap off the southern-most point in the US but still managed to snag a touristy picture with a sign to prove we had been there. 
Next, we headed to Green Sand Beach--only a left turn and five minute drive away! What they don’t tell you before reaching this destination is that you have to hike 3-4miles along the coast to get there and there was no way we could drive along this rocky terrain without a hefty truck. Lucky for us we grabbed a ride with a local named James whose family has lived in the area for TEN generations. When we finally arrived, the view below was absolutely stunning. Amira took the panorama of the beach with her iPhone that you see can above. We had to climb down to the beach, but there was a pathway as well as ladders to help us get there. The sand was more of an olive green with a gold tint to it. There are only two Green Sand Beaches in the world: one in the Big Island and the other is in the Galapagos! It was probably tied with Mauna Kea for my favorite trips in Hawaii. 
Before leaving, we stopped at the “Southernmost Restaurant and Bar” in the US. The food wasn’t incredible but it was a neat experience. On the drive back, we made some unexpected friends…yep, that’s a zebra!!
 

Volcano National Park, South Point & Green Sand Beach.

This weekend, Amira, Ashley, Sam & I adventured once again—our first stop, Hawaii Volcano National Park. We camped overnight in the primitive camping area which was essentially barren wasteland. Because it was so windy and arid, we were not allowed to have a campfire. To make up for its lack of pyro-capabilities, our campsite had a really neat view of the glowing volcano crater & lack of light pollution made for incredible stargazing!

The next day, we drove around the park down to the coastline and saw some not-so-steamy steam vents before heading to the SOUTHERN-MOST POINT IN THE US! When we reached southpoint, we thought we saw people fishing for sharks—turns out they were just fishing for whatever would bite and the crowd surrounding them was actually a group of teens cliff-jumping. We weren’t able to muster up the bravery to make the leap off the southern-most point in the US but still managed to snag a touristy picture with a sign to prove we had been there.

Next, we headed to Green Sand Beach--only a left turn and five minute drive away! What they don’t tell you before reaching this destination is that you have to hike 3-4miles along the coast to get there and there was no way we could drive along this rocky terrain without a hefty truck. Lucky for us we grabbed a ride with a local named James whose family has lived in the area for TEN generations. When we finally arrived, the view below was absolutely stunning. Amira took the panorama of the beach with her iPhone that you see can above. We had to climb down to the beach, but there was a pathway as well as ladders to help us get there. The sand was more of an olive green with a gold tint to it. There are only two Green Sand Beaches in the world: one in the Big Island and the other is in the Galapagos! It was probably tied with Mauna Kea for my favorite trips in Hawaii. 

Before leaving, we stopped at the “Southernmost Restaurant and Bar” in the US. The food wasn’t incredible but it was a neat experience. On the drive back, we made some unexpected friends…yep, that’s a zebra!!

 

40 degrees in Hawaii? Yeah it was!
This past Wednesday, Sam, Ashley, Amira and I made the two hour drive to Mauna Kea—the “tallest mountain in the world from base (under the ocean) to peak!! It’s over 33,000 feet tall; however the peak stands at around 12,000ft—enough to get us well above the clouds. PB&J’s in hand, we watched the sunset and returned to the foot of the mountain for some incredible stargazing!! 40 degrees in Hawaii? Yeah it was!
This past Wednesday, Sam, Ashley, Amira and I made the two hour drive to Mauna Kea—the “tallest mountain in the world from base (under the ocean) to peak!! It’s over 33,000 feet tall; however the peak stands at around 12,000ft—enough to get us well above the clouds. PB&J’s in hand, we watched the sunset and returned to the foot of the mountain for some incredible stargazing!! 40 degrees in Hawaii? Yeah it was!
This past Wednesday, Sam, Ashley, Amira and I made the two hour drive to Mauna Kea—the “tallest mountain in the world from base (under the ocean) to peak!! It’s over 33,000 feet tall; however the peak stands at around 12,000ft—enough to get us well above the clouds. PB&J’s in hand, we watched the sunset and returned to the foot of the mountain for some incredible stargazing!! 40 degrees in Hawaii? Yeah it was!
This past Wednesday, Sam, Ashley, Amira and I made the two hour drive to Mauna Kea—the “tallest mountain in the world from base (under the ocean) to peak!! It’s over 33,000 feet tall; however the peak stands at around 12,000ft—enough to get us well above the clouds. PB&J’s in hand, we watched the sunset and returned to the foot of the mountain for some incredible stargazing!! 40 degrees in Hawaii? Yeah it was!
This past Wednesday, Sam, Ashley, Amira and I made the two hour drive to Mauna Kea—the “tallest mountain in the world from base (under the ocean) to peak!! It’s over 33,000 feet tall; however the peak stands at around 12,000ft—enough to get us well above the clouds. PB&J’s in hand, we watched the sunset and returned to the foot of the mountain for some incredible stargazing!! 40 degrees in Hawaii? Yeah it was!
This past Wednesday, Sam, Ashley, Amira and I made the two hour drive to Mauna Kea—the “tallest mountain in the world from base (under the ocean) to peak!! It’s over 33,000 feet tall; however the peak stands at around 12,000ft—enough to get us well above the clouds. PB&J’s in hand, we watched the sunset and returned to the foot of the mountain for some incredible stargazing!! 40 degrees in Hawaii? Yeah it was!
This past Wednesday, Sam, Ashley, Amira and I made the two hour drive to Mauna Kea—the “tallest mountain in the world from base (under the ocean) to peak!! It’s over 33,000 feet tall; however the peak stands at around 12,000ft—enough to get us well above the clouds. PB&J’s in hand, we watched the sunset and returned to the foot of the mountain for some incredible stargazing!! 40 degrees in Hawaii? Yeah it was!
This past Wednesday, Sam, Ashley, Amira and I made the two hour drive to Mauna Kea—the “tallest mountain in the world from base (under the ocean) to peak!! It’s over 33,000 feet tall; however the peak stands at around 12,000ft—enough to get us well above the clouds. PB&J’s in hand, we watched the sunset and returned to the foot of the mountain for some incredible stargazing!!

40 degrees in Hawaii? Yeah it was!

This past Wednesday, Sam, Ashley, Amira and I made the two hour drive to Mauna Kea—the “tallest mountain in the world from base (under the ocean) to peak!! It’s over 33,000 feet tall; however the peak stands at around 12,000ft—enough to get us well above the clouds. PB&J’s in hand, we watched the sunset and returned to the foot of the mountain for some incredible stargazing!!

An Elusive Paradise!!
This past weekend Sam, Amira, Ashley and I journeyed to an unofficial camping ground—considered one of the hidden gems of the Big Island. The obscured left turn to get to the bumpy road leading to this elusive paradise keeps out most tourists! Amira and I set up the tent while Sam and Ashley set up their hammocks.
After some exploring we were ready to chow down on some chili and cornbread—my favorite camping meal!  The oranges and pinks melting into the water-colored horizon signaled us to tend to our fire. We quickly grabbed the graham crackers and delectable Hershey’s chocolate and began roasting marshmallows. After fending off our S’mores from approaching cockroaches, we were ready tp hit the sack.
The crisp ocean air lured me out of bed the next morning. We each found our own, private, individual havens along the black porous rock to journal and read. We finally capped off our adventure by jumping into the clear blue water that had surrounded us throughout our journey!  An Elusive Paradise!!
This past weekend Sam, Amira, Ashley and I journeyed to an unofficial camping ground—considered one of the hidden gems of the Big Island. The obscured left turn to get to the bumpy road leading to this elusive paradise keeps out most tourists! Amira and I set up the tent while Sam and Ashley set up their hammocks.
After some exploring we were ready to chow down on some chili and cornbread—my favorite camping meal!  The oranges and pinks melting into the water-colored horizon signaled us to tend to our fire. We quickly grabbed the graham crackers and delectable Hershey’s chocolate and began roasting marshmallows. After fending off our S’mores from approaching cockroaches, we were ready tp hit the sack.
The crisp ocean air lured me out of bed the next morning. We each found our own, private, individual havens along the black porous rock to journal and read. We finally capped off our adventure by jumping into the clear blue water that had surrounded us throughout our journey!  An Elusive Paradise!!
This past weekend Sam, Amira, Ashley and I journeyed to an unofficial camping ground—considered one of the hidden gems of the Big Island. The obscured left turn to get to the bumpy road leading to this elusive paradise keeps out most tourists! Amira and I set up the tent while Sam and Ashley set up their hammocks.
After some exploring we were ready to chow down on some chili and cornbread—my favorite camping meal!  The oranges and pinks melting into the water-colored horizon signaled us to tend to our fire. We quickly grabbed the graham crackers and delectable Hershey’s chocolate and began roasting marshmallows. After fending off our S’mores from approaching cockroaches, we were ready tp hit the sack.
The crisp ocean air lured me out of bed the next morning. We each found our own, private, individual havens along the black porous rock to journal and read. We finally capped off our adventure by jumping into the clear blue water that had surrounded us throughout our journey!  An Elusive Paradise!!
This past weekend Sam, Amira, Ashley and I journeyed to an unofficial camping ground—considered one of the hidden gems of the Big Island. The obscured left turn to get to the bumpy road leading to this elusive paradise keeps out most tourists! Amira and I set up the tent while Sam and Ashley set up their hammocks.
After some exploring we were ready to chow down on some chili and cornbread—my favorite camping meal!  The oranges and pinks melting into the water-colored horizon signaled us to tend to our fire. We quickly grabbed the graham crackers and delectable Hershey’s chocolate and began roasting marshmallows. After fending off our S’mores from approaching cockroaches, we were ready tp hit the sack.
The crisp ocean air lured me out of bed the next morning. We each found our own, private, individual havens along the black porous rock to journal and read. We finally capped off our adventure by jumping into the clear blue water that had surrounded us throughout our journey!  An Elusive Paradise!!
This past weekend Sam, Amira, Ashley and I journeyed to an unofficial camping ground—considered one of the hidden gems of the Big Island. The obscured left turn to get to the bumpy road leading to this elusive paradise keeps out most tourists! Amira and I set up the tent while Sam and Ashley set up their hammocks.
After some exploring we were ready to chow down on some chili and cornbread—my favorite camping meal!  The oranges and pinks melting into the water-colored horizon signaled us to tend to our fire. We quickly grabbed the graham crackers and delectable Hershey’s chocolate and began roasting marshmallows. After fending off our S’mores from approaching cockroaches, we were ready tp hit the sack.
The crisp ocean air lured me out of bed the next morning. We each found our own, private, individual havens along the black porous rock to journal and read. We finally capped off our adventure by jumping into the clear blue water that had surrounded us throughout our journey!  An Elusive Paradise!!
This past weekend Sam, Amira, Ashley and I journeyed to an unofficial camping ground—considered one of the hidden gems of the Big Island. The obscured left turn to get to the bumpy road leading to this elusive paradise keeps out most tourists! Amira and I set up the tent while Sam and Ashley set up their hammocks.
After some exploring we were ready to chow down on some chili and cornbread—my favorite camping meal!  The oranges and pinks melting into the water-colored horizon signaled us to tend to our fire. We quickly grabbed the graham crackers and delectable Hershey’s chocolate and began roasting marshmallows. After fending off our S’mores from approaching cockroaches, we were ready tp hit the sack.
The crisp ocean air lured me out of bed the next morning. We each found our own, private, individual havens along the black porous rock to journal and read. We finally capped off our adventure by jumping into the clear blue water that had surrounded us throughout our journey!  An Elusive Paradise!!
This past weekend Sam, Amira, Ashley and I journeyed to an unofficial camping ground—considered one of the hidden gems of the Big Island. The obscured left turn to get to the bumpy road leading to this elusive paradise keeps out most tourists! Amira and I set up the tent while Sam and Ashley set up their hammocks.
After some exploring we were ready to chow down on some chili and cornbread—my favorite camping meal!  The oranges and pinks melting into the water-colored horizon signaled us to tend to our fire. We quickly grabbed the graham crackers and delectable Hershey’s chocolate and began roasting marshmallows. After fending off our S’mores from approaching cockroaches, we were ready tp hit the sack.
The crisp ocean air lured me out of bed the next morning. We each found our own, private, individual havens along the black porous rock to journal and read. We finally capped off our adventure by jumping into the clear blue water that had surrounded us throughout our journey!  An Elusive Paradise!!
This past weekend Sam, Amira, Ashley and I journeyed to an unofficial camping ground—considered one of the hidden gems of the Big Island. The obscured left turn to get to the bumpy road leading to this elusive paradise keeps out most tourists! Amira and I set up the tent while Sam and Ashley set up their hammocks.
After some exploring we were ready to chow down on some chili and cornbread—my favorite camping meal!  The oranges and pinks melting into the water-colored horizon signaled us to tend to our fire. We quickly grabbed the graham crackers and delectable Hershey’s chocolate and began roasting marshmallows. After fending off our S’mores from approaching cockroaches, we were ready tp hit the sack.
The crisp ocean air lured me out of bed the next morning. We each found our own, private, individual havens along the black porous rock to journal and read. We finally capped off our adventure by jumping into the clear blue water that had surrounded us throughout our journey!  An Elusive Paradise!!
This past weekend Sam, Amira, Ashley and I journeyed to an unofficial camping ground—considered one of the hidden gems of the Big Island. The obscured left turn to get to the bumpy road leading to this elusive paradise keeps out most tourists! Amira and I set up the tent while Sam and Ashley set up their hammocks.
After some exploring we were ready to chow down on some chili and cornbread—my favorite camping meal!  The oranges and pinks melting into the water-colored horizon signaled us to tend to our fire. We quickly grabbed the graham crackers and delectable Hershey’s chocolate and began roasting marshmallows. After fending off our S’mores from approaching cockroaches, we were ready tp hit the sack.
The crisp ocean air lured me out of bed the next morning. We each found our own, private, individual havens along the black porous rock to journal and read. We finally capped off our adventure by jumping into the clear blue water that had surrounded us throughout our journey!  An Elusive Paradise!!
This past weekend Sam, Amira, Ashley and I journeyed to an unofficial camping ground—considered one of the hidden gems of the Big Island. The obscured left turn to get to the bumpy road leading to this elusive paradise keeps out most tourists! Amira and I set up the tent while Sam and Ashley set up their hammocks.
After some exploring we were ready to chow down on some chili and cornbread—my favorite camping meal!  The oranges and pinks melting into the water-colored horizon signaled us to tend to our fire. We quickly grabbed the graham crackers and delectable Hershey’s chocolate and began roasting marshmallows. After fending off our S’mores from approaching cockroaches, we were ready tp hit the sack.
The crisp ocean air lured me out of bed the next morning. We each found our own, private, individual havens along the black porous rock to journal and read. We finally capped off our adventure by jumping into the clear blue water that had surrounded us throughout our journey! 

An Elusive Paradise!!

This past weekend Sam, Amira, Ashley and I journeyed to an unofficial camping ground—considered one of the hidden gems of the Big Island. The obscured left turn to get to the bumpy road leading to this elusive paradise keeps out most tourists! Amira and I set up the tent while Sam and Ashley set up their hammocks.

After some exploring we were ready to chow down on some chili and cornbread—my favorite camping meal!  The oranges and pinks melting into the water-colored horizon signaled us to tend to our fire. We quickly grabbed the graham crackers and delectable Hershey’s chocolate and began roasting marshmallows. After fending off our S’mores from approaching cockroaches, we were ready tp hit the sack.

The crisp ocean air lured me out of bed the next morning. We each found our own, private, individual havens along the black porous rock to journal and read. We finally capped off our adventure by jumping into the clear blue water that had surrounded us throughout our journey! 

My SD card arrived! Yayyy! While my iPod & Instagram have faired well thus far, I look forward to providing a new perspective of the farm with my Nikon!

So what else is new?
Joey’s brother Shane got here last week so we had an awesome cookout at the beach!! Speaking of dinners, the photo sandwiched between the silouhette of the monkey pods and the tape measure depicts the typical set-up of our daily family dinners here on the farm! Kate is an excellent cook, and every night feels like a gourmet meal. Last but not least, I’ve made plans to make a bread holder. I’m SUPER-DUPER excited considering this will be my first time following my own pans rather than a plan from a website (like for the side table we made). It should be finished in a few days so I’ll post some pictures of the final product.
P.S. I forgot my SD card for my camera in good ole North Kakalacky….& the one I ordered off of amazon finally came in!! Yayyy for higher quality photographs..soon to come :))

xoxo
-aly So what else is new?
Joey’s brother Shane got here last week so we had an awesome cookout at the beach!! Speaking of dinners, the photo sandwiched between the silouhette of the monkey pods and the tape measure depicts the typical set-up of our daily family dinners here on the farm! Kate is an excellent cook, and every night feels like a gourmet meal. Last but not least, I’ve made plans to make a bread holder. I’m SUPER-DUPER excited considering this will be my first time following my own pans rather than a plan from a website (like for the side table we made). It should be finished in a few days so I’ll post some pictures of the final product.
P.S. I forgot my SD card for my camera in good ole North Kakalacky….& the one I ordered off of amazon finally came in!! Yayyy for higher quality photographs..soon to come :))

xoxo
-aly So what else is new?
Joey’s brother Shane got here last week so we had an awesome cookout at the beach!! Speaking of dinners, the photo sandwiched between the silouhette of the monkey pods and the tape measure depicts the typical set-up of our daily family dinners here on the farm! Kate is an excellent cook, and every night feels like a gourmet meal. Last but not least, I’ve made plans to make a bread holder. I’m SUPER-DUPER excited considering this will be my first time following my own pans rather than a plan from a website (like for the side table we made). It should be finished in a few days so I’ll post some pictures of the final product.
P.S. I forgot my SD card for my camera in good ole North Kakalacky….& the one I ordered off of amazon finally came in!! Yayyy for higher quality photographs..soon to come :))

xoxo
-aly So what else is new?
Joey’s brother Shane got here last week so we had an awesome cookout at the beach!! Speaking of dinners, the photo sandwiched between the silouhette of the monkey pods and the tape measure depicts the typical set-up of our daily family dinners here on the farm! Kate is an excellent cook, and every night feels like a gourmet meal. Last but not least, I’ve made plans to make a bread holder. I’m SUPER-DUPER excited considering this will be my first time following my own pans rather than a plan from a website (like for the side table we made). It should be finished in a few days so I’ll post some pictures of the final product.
P.S. I forgot my SD card for my camera in good ole North Kakalacky….& the one I ordered off of amazon finally came in!! Yayyy for higher quality photographs..soon to come :))

xoxo
-aly So what else is new?
Joey’s brother Shane got here last week so we had an awesome cookout at the beach!! Speaking of dinners, the photo sandwiched between the silouhette of the monkey pods and the tape measure depicts the typical set-up of our daily family dinners here on the farm! Kate is an excellent cook, and every night feels like a gourmet meal. Last but not least, I’ve made plans to make a bread holder. I’m SUPER-DUPER excited considering this will be my first time following my own pans rather than a plan from a website (like for the side table we made). It should be finished in a few days so I’ll post some pictures of the final product.
P.S. I forgot my SD card for my camera in good ole North Kakalacky….& the one I ordered off of amazon finally came in!! Yayyy for higher quality photographs..soon to come :))

xoxo
-aly So what else is new?
Joey’s brother Shane got here last week so we had an awesome cookout at the beach!! Speaking of dinners, the photo sandwiched between the silouhette of the monkey pods and the tape measure depicts the typical set-up of our daily family dinners here on the farm! Kate is an excellent cook, and every night feels like a gourmet meal. Last but not least, I’ve made plans to make a bread holder. I’m SUPER-DUPER excited considering this will be my first time following my own pans rather than a plan from a website (like for the side table we made). It should be finished in a few days so I’ll post some pictures of the final product.
P.S. I forgot my SD card for my camera in good ole North Kakalacky….& the one I ordered off of amazon finally came in!! Yayyy for higher quality photographs..soon to come :))

xoxo
-aly

So what else is new?

Joey’s brother Shane got here last week so we had an awesome cookout at the beach!! Speaking of dinners, the photo sandwiched between the silouhette of the monkey pods and the tape measure depicts the typical set-up of our daily family dinners here on the farm! Kate is an excellent cook, and every night feels like a gourmet meal. Last but not least, I’ve made plans to make a bread holder. I’m SUPER-DUPER excited considering this will be my first time following my own pans rather than a plan from a website (like for the side table we made). It should be finished in a few days so I’ll post some pictures of the final product.

P.S. I forgot my SD card for my camera in good ole North Kakalacky….& the one I ordered off of amazon finally came in!! Yayyy for higher quality photographs..soon to come :))

xoxo

-aly

Meet Bruce—the other dog here on the farm! Bruce & Bells recently got spayed/neutered so Bruce has been rockin the cone the past few days.
Lately we’ve made lots of progress on the raised beds for commercial vegetables and we’ve finished the raised beds for personal use (I’ll put some pictures up soon, but for now, check out the tomato post signs).
I recently finished, Mountains Beyond Mountains, the story of Dr. Paul Farmer, an incredible infectious disease epidemiologist and anthropologist who has contributed to the eradication of Tuberculosis as well as the fight against HIV/AIDS in developing nations. I’ve really enjoyed being able to start reading by choice rather than by “force” (when I’m at school) haha. 
We’ve done lots of exploring and plan to do some camping soon at an incredible location in the last photo above! We found this spot not too far from Pu‘uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Par, also pictured above (palm trees & really neat wood carvings).
Meet Bruce—the other dog here on the farm! Bruce & Bells recently got spayed/neutered so Bruce has been rockin the cone the past few days.
Lately we’ve made lots of progress on the raised beds for commercial vegetables and we’ve finished the raised beds for personal use (I’ll put some pictures up soon, but for now, check out the tomato post signs).
I recently finished, Mountains Beyond Mountains, the story of Dr. Paul Farmer, an incredible infectious disease epidemiologist and anthropologist who has contributed to the eradication of Tuberculosis as well as the fight against HIV/AIDS in developing nations. I’ve really enjoyed being able to start reading by choice rather than by “force” (when I’m at school) haha. 
We’ve done lots of exploring and plan to do some camping soon at an incredible location in the last photo above! We found this spot not too far from Pu‘uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Par, also pictured above (palm trees & really neat wood carvings).
Meet Bruce—the other dog here on the farm! Bruce & Bells recently got spayed/neutered so Bruce has been rockin the cone the past few days.
Lately we’ve made lots of progress on the raised beds for commercial vegetables and we’ve finished the raised beds for personal use (I’ll put some pictures up soon, but for now, check out the tomato post signs).
I recently finished, Mountains Beyond Mountains, the story of Dr. Paul Farmer, an incredible infectious disease epidemiologist and anthropologist who has contributed to the eradication of Tuberculosis as well as the fight against HIV/AIDS in developing nations. I’ve really enjoyed being able to start reading by choice rather than by “force” (when I’m at school) haha. 
We’ve done lots of exploring and plan to do some camping soon at an incredible location in the last photo above! We found this spot not too far from Pu‘uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Par, also pictured above (palm trees & really neat wood carvings).
Meet Bruce—the other dog here on the farm! Bruce & Bells recently got spayed/neutered so Bruce has been rockin the cone the past few days.
Lately we’ve made lots of progress on the raised beds for commercial vegetables and we’ve finished the raised beds for personal use (I’ll put some pictures up soon, but for now, check out the tomato post signs).
I recently finished, Mountains Beyond Mountains, the story of Dr. Paul Farmer, an incredible infectious disease epidemiologist and anthropologist who has contributed to the eradication of Tuberculosis as well as the fight against HIV/AIDS in developing nations. I’ve really enjoyed being able to start reading by choice rather than by “force” (when I’m at school) haha. 
We’ve done lots of exploring and plan to do some camping soon at an incredible location in the last photo above! We found this spot not too far from Pu‘uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Par, also pictured above (palm trees & really neat wood carvings).
Meet Bruce—the other dog here on the farm! Bruce & Bells recently got spayed/neutered so Bruce has been rockin the cone the past few days.
Lately we’ve made lots of progress on the raised beds for commercial vegetables and we’ve finished the raised beds for personal use (I’ll put some pictures up soon, but for now, check out the tomato post signs).
I recently finished, Mountains Beyond Mountains, the story of Dr. Paul Farmer, an incredible infectious disease epidemiologist and anthropologist who has contributed to the eradication of Tuberculosis as well as the fight against HIV/AIDS in developing nations. I’ve really enjoyed being able to start reading by choice rather than by “force” (when I’m at school) haha. 
We’ve done lots of exploring and plan to do some camping soon at an incredible location in the last photo above! We found this spot not too far from Pu‘uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Par, also pictured above (palm trees & really neat wood carvings).
Meet Bruce—the other dog here on the farm! Bruce & Bells recently got spayed/neutered so Bruce has been rockin the cone the past few days.
Lately we’ve made lots of progress on the raised beds for commercial vegetables and we’ve finished the raised beds for personal use (I’ll put some pictures up soon, but for now, check out the tomato post signs).
I recently finished, Mountains Beyond Mountains, the story of Dr. Paul Farmer, an incredible infectious disease epidemiologist and anthropologist who has contributed to the eradication of Tuberculosis as well as the fight against HIV/AIDS in developing nations. I’ve really enjoyed being able to start reading by choice rather than by “force” (when I’m at school) haha. 
We’ve done lots of exploring and plan to do some camping soon at an incredible location in the last photo above! We found this spot not too far from Pu‘uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Par, also pictured above (palm trees & really neat wood carvings).
Meet Bruce—the other dog here on the farm! Bruce & Bells recently got spayed/neutered so Bruce has been rockin the cone the past few days.
Lately we’ve made lots of progress on the raised beds for commercial vegetables and we’ve finished the raised beds for personal use (I’ll put some pictures up soon, but for now, check out the tomato post signs).
I recently finished, Mountains Beyond Mountains, the story of Dr. Paul Farmer, an incredible infectious disease epidemiologist and anthropologist who has contributed to the eradication of Tuberculosis as well as the fight against HIV/AIDS in developing nations. I’ve really enjoyed being able to start reading by choice rather than by “force” (when I’m at school) haha. 
We’ve done lots of exploring and plan to do some camping soon at an incredible location in the last photo above! We found this spot not too far from Pu‘uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Par, also pictured above (palm trees & really neat wood carvings).
Meet Bruce—the other dog here on the farm! Bruce & Bells recently got spayed/neutered so Bruce has been rockin the cone the past few days.
Lately we’ve made lots of progress on the raised beds for commercial vegetables and we’ve finished the raised beds for personal use (I’ll put some pictures up soon, but for now, check out the tomato post signs).
I recently finished, Mountains Beyond Mountains, the story of Dr. Paul Farmer, an incredible infectious disease epidemiologist and anthropologist who has contributed to the eradication of Tuberculosis as well as the fight against HIV/AIDS in developing nations. I’ve really enjoyed being able to start reading by choice rather than by “force” (when I’m at school) haha. 
We’ve done lots of exploring and plan to do some camping soon at an incredible location in the last photo above! We found this spot not too far from Pu‘uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Par, also pictured above (palm trees & really neat wood carvings).
Meet Bruce—the other dog here on the farm! Bruce & Bells recently got spayed/neutered so Bruce has been rockin the cone the past few days.
Lately we’ve made lots of progress on the raised beds for commercial vegetables and we’ve finished the raised beds for personal use (I’ll put some pictures up soon, but for now, check out the tomato post signs).
I recently finished, Mountains Beyond Mountains, the story of Dr. Paul Farmer, an incredible infectious disease epidemiologist and anthropologist who has contributed to the eradication of Tuberculosis as well as the fight against HIV/AIDS in developing nations. I’ve really enjoyed being able to start reading by choice rather than by “force” (when I’m at school) haha. 
We’ve done lots of exploring and plan to do some camping soon at an incredible location in the last photo above! We found this spot not too far from Pu‘uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Par, also pictured above (palm trees & really neat wood carvings).
Meet Bruce—the other dog here on the farm! Bruce & Bells recently got spayed/neutered so Bruce has been rockin the cone the past few days.
Lately we’ve made lots of progress on the raised beds for commercial vegetables and we’ve finished the raised beds for personal use (I’ll put some pictures up soon, but for now, check out the tomato post signs).
I recently finished, Mountains Beyond Mountains, the story of Dr. Paul Farmer, an incredible infectious disease epidemiologist and anthropologist who has contributed to the eradication of Tuberculosis as well as the fight against HIV/AIDS in developing nations. I’ve really enjoyed being able to start reading by choice rather than by “force” (when I’m at school) haha. 
We’ve done lots of exploring and plan to do some camping soon at an incredible location in the last photo above! We found this spot not too far from Pu‘uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Par, also pictured above (palm trees & really neat wood carvings).
  • Meet Bruce—the other dog here on the farm! Bruce & Bells recently got spayed/neutered so Bruce has been rockin the cone the past few days.
  • Lately we’ve made lots of progress on the raised beds for commercial vegetables and we’ve finished the raised beds for personal use (I’ll put some pictures up soon, but for now, check out the tomato post signs).
  • I recently finished, Mountains Beyond Mountains, the story of Dr. Paul Farmer, an incredible infectious disease epidemiologist and anthropologist who has contributed to the eradication of Tuberculosis as well as the fight against HIV/AIDS in developing nations. I’ve really enjoyed being able to start reading by choice rather than by “force” (when I’m at school) haha. 
  • We’ve done lots of exploring and plan to do some camping soon at an incredible location in the last photo above! We found this spot not too far from Pu‘uhonua O Honaunau National Historical Par, also pictured above (palm trees & really neat wood carvings).
Fishing for Rocks & Grating Cheese…soil.
Lately we’ve been incredibly busy building raised beds. The intensive physical labor required to build these beds makes finishing one extremely rewarding. We usually average about two a day. It’s a lot of work but totally worth it…they are so aesthetically pleasing when completed! 
How to Make a Raised Bed:
First, we fish for rocks to surround the bed…or at least that’s what it’s come to feel like 
when someone finds a big rock, we all stop digging and gather around to see the “great catch”
we then dig for soil on either side of the bed and add it to the “soil sifter” (wooden contraption above)
Then we grate the soil like cheese…we filter this soil through the top to separate the dirt which falls through from the rocks which remain above 
we add compost on top of the filtered soil
then, we mix it together and PLANT!
Soon we will have a multitude of VEGGIES to indulge in!!!!
P.S. Our newest WWOOFer has arrived…Amira from NYC! You can see me and Amira above sifting soil and grating cheese ;) Fishing for Rocks & Grating Cheese…soil.
Lately we’ve been incredibly busy building raised beds. The intensive physical labor required to build these beds makes finishing one extremely rewarding. We usually average about two a day. It’s a lot of work but totally worth it…they are so aesthetically pleasing when completed! 
How to Make a Raised Bed:
First, we fish for rocks to surround the bed…or at least that’s what it’s come to feel like 
when someone finds a big rock, we all stop digging and gather around to see the “great catch”
we then dig for soil on either side of the bed and add it to the “soil sifter” (wooden contraption above)
Then we grate the soil like cheese…we filter this soil through the top to separate the dirt which falls through from the rocks which remain above 
we add compost on top of the filtered soil
then, we mix it together and PLANT!
Soon we will have a multitude of VEGGIES to indulge in!!!!
P.S. Our newest WWOOFer has arrived…Amira from NYC! You can see me and Amira above sifting soil and grating cheese ;) Fishing for Rocks & Grating Cheese…soil.
Lately we’ve been incredibly busy building raised beds. The intensive physical labor required to build these beds makes finishing one extremely rewarding. We usually average about two a day. It’s a lot of work but totally worth it…they are so aesthetically pleasing when completed! 
How to Make a Raised Bed:
First, we fish for rocks to surround the bed…or at least that’s what it’s come to feel like 
when someone finds a big rock, we all stop digging and gather around to see the “great catch”
we then dig for soil on either side of the bed and add it to the “soil sifter” (wooden contraption above)
Then we grate the soil like cheese…we filter this soil through the top to separate the dirt which falls through from the rocks which remain above 
we add compost on top of the filtered soil
then, we mix it together and PLANT!
Soon we will have a multitude of VEGGIES to indulge in!!!!
P.S. Our newest WWOOFer has arrived…Amira from NYC! You can see me and Amira above sifting soil and grating cheese ;) Fishing for Rocks & Grating Cheese…soil.
Lately we’ve been incredibly busy building raised beds. The intensive physical labor required to build these beds makes finishing one extremely rewarding. We usually average about two a day. It’s a lot of work but totally worth it…they are so aesthetically pleasing when completed! 
How to Make a Raised Bed:
First, we fish for rocks to surround the bed…or at least that’s what it’s come to feel like 
when someone finds a big rock, we all stop digging and gather around to see the “great catch”
we then dig for soil on either side of the bed and add it to the “soil sifter” (wooden contraption above)
Then we grate the soil like cheese…we filter this soil through the top to separate the dirt which falls through from the rocks which remain above 
we add compost on top of the filtered soil
then, we mix it together and PLANT!
Soon we will have a multitude of VEGGIES to indulge in!!!!
P.S. Our newest WWOOFer has arrived…Amira from NYC! You can see me and Amira above sifting soil and grating cheese ;) Fishing for Rocks & Grating Cheese…soil.
Lately we’ve been incredibly busy building raised beds. The intensive physical labor required to build these beds makes finishing one extremely rewarding. We usually average about two a day. It’s a lot of work but totally worth it…they are so aesthetically pleasing when completed! 
How to Make a Raised Bed:
First, we fish for rocks to surround the bed…or at least that’s what it’s come to feel like 
when someone finds a big rock, we all stop digging and gather around to see the “great catch”
we then dig for soil on either side of the bed and add it to the “soil sifter” (wooden contraption above)
Then we grate the soil like cheese…we filter this soil through the top to separate the dirt which falls through from the rocks which remain above 
we add compost on top of the filtered soil
then, we mix it together and PLANT!
Soon we will have a multitude of VEGGIES to indulge in!!!!
P.S. Our newest WWOOFer has arrived…Amira from NYC! You can see me and Amira above sifting soil and grating cheese ;) Fishing for Rocks & Grating Cheese…soil.
Lately we’ve been incredibly busy building raised beds. The intensive physical labor required to build these beds makes finishing one extremely rewarding. We usually average about two a day. It’s a lot of work but totally worth it…they are so aesthetically pleasing when completed! 
How to Make a Raised Bed:
First, we fish for rocks to surround the bed…or at least that’s what it’s come to feel like 
when someone finds a big rock, we all stop digging and gather around to see the “great catch”
we then dig for soil on either side of the bed and add it to the “soil sifter” (wooden contraption above)
Then we grate the soil like cheese…we filter this soil through the top to separate the dirt which falls through from the rocks which remain above 
we add compost on top of the filtered soil
then, we mix it together and PLANT!
Soon we will have a multitude of VEGGIES to indulge in!!!!
P.S. Our newest WWOOFer has arrived…Amira from NYC! You can see me and Amira above sifting soil and grating cheese ;) Fishing for Rocks & Grating Cheese…soil.
Lately we’ve been incredibly busy building raised beds. The intensive physical labor required to build these beds makes finishing one extremely rewarding. We usually average about two a day. It’s a lot of work but totally worth it…they are so aesthetically pleasing when completed! 
How to Make a Raised Bed:
First, we fish for rocks to surround the bed…or at least that’s what it’s come to feel like 
when someone finds a big rock, we all stop digging and gather around to see the “great catch”
we then dig for soil on either side of the bed and add it to the “soil sifter” (wooden contraption above)
Then we grate the soil like cheese…we filter this soil through the top to separate the dirt which falls through from the rocks which remain above 
we add compost on top of the filtered soil
then, we mix it together and PLANT!
Soon we will have a multitude of VEGGIES to indulge in!!!!
P.S. Our newest WWOOFer has arrived…Amira from NYC! You can see me and Amira above sifting soil and grating cheese ;)

Fishing for Rocks & Grating Cheese…soil.

Lately we’ve been incredibly busy building raised beds. The intensive physical labor required to build these beds makes finishing one extremely rewarding. We usually average about two a day. It’s a lot of work but totally worth it…they are so aesthetically pleasing when completed! 

How to Make a Raised Bed:

  • First, we fish for rocks to surround the bed…or at least that’s what it’s come to feel like 
  • when someone finds a big rock, we all stop digging and gather around to see the “great catch”
  • we then dig for soil on either side of the bed and add it to the “soil sifter” (wooden contraption above)
  • Then we grate the soil like cheese…we filter this soil through the top to separate the dirt which falls through from the rocks which remain above 
  • we add compost on top of the filtered soil
  • then, we mix it together and PLANT!

Soon we will have a multitude of VEGGIES to indulge in!!!!

P.S. Our newest WWOOFer has arrived…Amira from NYC! You can see me and Amira above sifting soil and grating cheese ;)

Bee’s, Beaches, & Books.
Bee Colony…A Feminist Heirarchy
The Queen in the center and driving force of the colony
the only male’s in the colony are called drones
they do not do any work, are incapable of feeding themselves and are only used for mating (they die immediately after mating)
Honey Bee’s perform a “waggle dance” which includes a series of figure eights to tell the other bees how far away a valuable food sources is  (depends on the number of figure eights and the angle of bee’s body to sun when performing the dance)
pollination from honey bees increase crop yields
I got to wear an awesome bee suit at a Bee Class we went to last Sunday in Hilo, about two hours away. The drive across the island reaffirmed its diverse geography. We drove from the Mountains of Holualoa, along the coastline of Kona, through the rolling hills of Waimea, and into the arid desert land which is known for having the tallest mountain in the world from base (beneath the ocean) to peak: Mauna Kea. Its elevation is 13,796 ft, but from base to peak it stands over 30,000 ft tall!
We’ve been really busy building bed’s lately so it was nice to escape to the beach yesterday and finish my book:  All Natural* A Skeptic’s Quest to Discover if the Natural Approach to Diet, Childbirth, Healing, and the Environment really keeps us Healthier and Happier. It wasn’t as good as I had anticipated but it was still an enjoyable, informative read and I was stoked with the conclusion because it included Chris McCandless’ final quote: “Happiness only real when shared." 

  Bee’s, Beaches, & Books.
Bee Colony…A Feminist Heirarchy
The Queen in the center and driving force of the colony
the only male’s in the colony are called drones
they do not do any work, are incapable of feeding themselves and are only used for mating (they die immediately after mating)
Honey Bee’s perform a “waggle dance” which includes a series of figure eights to tell the other bees how far away a valuable food sources is  (depends on the number of figure eights and the angle of bee’s body to sun when performing the dance)
pollination from honey bees increase crop yields
I got to wear an awesome bee suit at a Bee Class we went to last Sunday in Hilo, about two hours away. The drive across the island reaffirmed its diverse geography. We drove from the Mountains of Holualoa, along the coastline of Kona, through the rolling hills of Waimea, and into the arid desert land which is known for having the tallest mountain in the world from base (beneath the ocean) to peak: Mauna Kea. Its elevation is 13,796 ft, but from base to peak it stands over 30,000 ft tall!
We’ve been really busy building bed’s lately so it was nice to escape to the beach yesterday and finish my book:  All Natural* A Skeptic’s Quest to Discover if the Natural Approach to Diet, Childbirth, Healing, and the Environment really keeps us Healthier and Happier. It wasn’t as good as I had anticipated but it was still an enjoyable, informative read and I was stoked with the conclusion because it included Chris McCandless’ final quote: “Happiness only real when shared." 

  Bee’s, Beaches, & Books.
Bee Colony…A Feminist Heirarchy
The Queen in the center and driving force of the colony
the only male’s in the colony are called drones
they do not do any work, are incapable of feeding themselves and are only used for mating (they die immediately after mating)
Honey Bee’s perform a “waggle dance” which includes a series of figure eights to tell the other bees how far away a valuable food sources is  (depends on the number of figure eights and the angle of bee’s body to sun when performing the dance)
pollination from honey bees increase crop yields
I got to wear an awesome bee suit at a Bee Class we went to last Sunday in Hilo, about two hours away. The drive across the island reaffirmed its diverse geography. We drove from the Mountains of Holualoa, along the coastline of Kona, through the rolling hills of Waimea, and into the arid desert land which is known for having the tallest mountain in the world from base (beneath the ocean) to peak: Mauna Kea. Its elevation is 13,796 ft, but from base to peak it stands over 30,000 ft tall!
We’ve been really busy building bed’s lately so it was nice to escape to the beach yesterday and finish my book:  All Natural* A Skeptic’s Quest to Discover if the Natural Approach to Diet, Childbirth, Healing, and the Environment really keeps us Healthier and Happier. It wasn’t as good as I had anticipated but it was still an enjoyable, informative read and I was stoked with the conclusion because it included Chris McCandless’ final quote: “Happiness only real when shared." 

  Bee’s, Beaches, & Books.
Bee Colony…A Feminist Heirarchy
The Queen in the center and driving force of the colony
the only male’s in the colony are called drones
they do not do any work, are incapable of feeding themselves and are only used for mating (they die immediately after mating)
Honey Bee’s perform a “waggle dance” which includes a series of figure eights to tell the other bees how far away a valuable food sources is  (depends on the number of figure eights and the angle of bee’s body to sun when performing the dance)
pollination from honey bees increase crop yields
I got to wear an awesome bee suit at a Bee Class we went to last Sunday in Hilo, about two hours away. The drive across the island reaffirmed its diverse geography. We drove from the Mountains of Holualoa, along the coastline of Kona, through the rolling hills of Waimea, and into the arid desert land which is known for having the tallest mountain in the world from base (beneath the ocean) to peak: Mauna Kea. Its elevation is 13,796 ft, but from base to peak it stands over 30,000 ft tall!
We’ve been really busy building bed’s lately so it was nice to escape to the beach yesterday and finish my book:  All Natural* A Skeptic’s Quest to Discover if the Natural Approach to Diet, Childbirth, Healing, and the Environment really keeps us Healthier and Happier. It wasn’t as good as I had anticipated but it was still an enjoyable, informative read and I was stoked with the conclusion because it included Chris McCandless’ final quote: “Happiness only real when shared." 

  Bee’s, Beaches, & Books.
Bee Colony…A Feminist Heirarchy
The Queen in the center and driving force of the colony
the only male’s in the colony are called drones
they do not do any work, are incapable of feeding themselves and are only used for mating (they die immediately after mating)
Honey Bee’s perform a “waggle dance” which includes a series of figure eights to tell the other bees how far away a valuable food sources is  (depends on the number of figure eights and the angle of bee’s body to sun when performing the dance)
pollination from honey bees increase crop yields
I got to wear an awesome bee suit at a Bee Class we went to last Sunday in Hilo, about two hours away. The drive across the island reaffirmed its diverse geography. We drove from the Mountains of Holualoa, along the coastline of Kona, through the rolling hills of Waimea, and into the arid desert land which is known for having the tallest mountain in the world from base (beneath the ocean) to peak: Mauna Kea. Its elevation is 13,796 ft, but from base to peak it stands over 30,000 ft tall!
We’ve been really busy building bed’s lately so it was nice to escape to the beach yesterday and finish my book:  All Natural* A Skeptic’s Quest to Discover if the Natural Approach to Diet, Childbirth, Healing, and the Environment really keeps us Healthier and Happier. It wasn’t as good as I had anticipated but it was still an enjoyable, informative read and I was stoked with the conclusion because it included Chris McCandless’ final quote: “Happiness only real when shared." 

  Bee’s, Beaches, & Books.
Bee Colony…A Feminist Heirarchy
The Queen in the center and driving force of the colony
the only male’s in the colony are called drones
they do not do any work, are incapable of feeding themselves and are only used for mating (they die immediately after mating)
Honey Bee’s perform a “waggle dance” which includes a series of figure eights to tell the other bees how far away a valuable food sources is  (depends on the number of figure eights and the angle of bee’s body to sun when performing the dance)
pollination from honey bees increase crop yields
I got to wear an awesome bee suit at a Bee Class we went to last Sunday in Hilo, about two hours away. The drive across the island reaffirmed its diverse geography. We drove from the Mountains of Holualoa, along the coastline of Kona, through the rolling hills of Waimea, and into the arid desert land which is known for having the tallest mountain in the world from base (beneath the ocean) to peak: Mauna Kea. Its elevation is 13,796 ft, but from base to peak it stands over 30,000 ft tall!
We’ve been really busy building bed’s lately so it was nice to escape to the beach yesterday and finish my book:  All Natural* A Skeptic’s Quest to Discover if the Natural Approach to Diet, Childbirth, Healing, and the Environment really keeps us Healthier and Happier. It wasn’t as good as I had anticipated but it was still an enjoyable, informative read and I was stoked with the conclusion because it included Chris McCandless’ final quote: “Happiness only real when shared." 

 

Bee’s, Beaches, & Books.

Bee Colony…A Feminist Heirarchy

  • The Queen in the center and driving force of the colony
  • the only male’s in the colony are called drones
  • they do not do any work, are incapable of feeding themselves and are only used for mating (they die immediately after mating)
  • Honey Bee’s perform a “waggle dance” which includes a series of figure eights to tell the other bees how far away a valuable food sources is  (depends on the number of figure eights and the angle of bee’s body to sun when performing the dance)
  • pollination from honey bees increase crop yields

I got to wear an awesome bee suit at a Bee Class we went to last Sunday in Hilo, about two hours away. The drive across the island reaffirmed its diverse geography. We drove from the Mountains of Holualoa, along the coastline of Kona, through the rolling hills of Waimea, and into the arid desert land which is known for having the tallest mountain in the world from base (beneath the ocean) to peak: Mauna Kea. Its elevation is 13,796 ft, but from base to peak it stands over 30,000 ft tall!

We’ve been really busy building bed’s lately so it was nice to escape to the beach yesterday and finish my book:  All Natural* A Skeptic’s Quest to Discover if the Natural Approach to Diet, Childbirth, Healing, and the Environment really keeps us Healthier and Happier. It wasn’t as good as I had anticipated but it was still an enjoyable, informative read and I was stoked with the conclusion because it included Chris McCandless’ final quote: “Happiness only real when shared.

 

Flowers at the Farmer’s Market! Flowers at the Farmer’s Market! Flowers at the Farmer’s Market! Flowers at the Farmer’s Market! Flowers at the Farmer’s Market! Flowers at the Farmer’s Market!

Flowers at the Farmer’s Market!

“If you are depressed, you are living in the past. If you are anxious, you are living in the future. If you are at peace, you are living in the present.”
Lao Tzu
Progress on Projects!
filled sign with concrete, soil, and plants!
built the greenhouse
built, sanded & stained the table
planted pea shoots
Progress on Projects!
filled sign with concrete, soil, and plants!
built the greenhouse
built, sanded & stained the table
planted pea shoots
Progress on Projects!
filled sign with concrete, soil, and plants!
built the greenhouse
built, sanded & stained the table
planted pea shoots
Progress on Projects!
filled sign with concrete, soil, and plants!
built the greenhouse
built, sanded & stained the table
planted pea shoots
Progress on Projects!
filled sign with concrete, soil, and plants!
built the greenhouse
built, sanded & stained the table
planted pea shoots
Progress on Projects!
filled sign with concrete, soil, and plants!
built the greenhouse
built, sanded & stained the table
planted pea shoots
Progress on Projects!
filled sign with concrete, soil, and plants!
built the greenhouse
built, sanded & stained the table
planted pea shoots
Progress on Projects!
filled sign with concrete, soil, and plants!
built the greenhouse
built, sanded & stained the table
planted pea shoots
Progress on Projects!
filled sign with concrete, soil, and plants!
built the greenhouse
built, sanded & stained the table
planted pea shoots

Progress on Projects!

  • filled sign with concrete, soil, and plants!
  • built the greenhouse
  • built, sanded & stained the table
  • planted pea shoots

Petrichor- the smell of earth after rain

I was completely taken aback by the brown dust, which now filled my view as we approached Phoenix. The Blue Ridge Mountains I was accustomed to seeing in my home state of North Carolina had grown exponentially, and were now dusted in a deep red-brown.

This seemingly mundane occurrence brought me such elation simply because it was new to me. I think this is the core of my coming experience: I will be immersed in a new, unfamiliar lifestyle performing tasks I have never executed, all in a location I have never been before. This unfamiliarity serves as the impetus for the thrill and excitement that will soon follow as I embark deeper on my journey. How so? Because although the unfamiliar may be uncomfortable to us at times, it presents the opportunity for us to learn; to become more skilled in areas we never knew possible, to connect with others in ways we have never experienced, and most importantly to grow and become more well-versed as individuals.

After over 14 hours of traveling , I finally made it to Kona. Flying in along the black, porous coastline of volcanic rock and touching down on the equally dark runway made it clear that The Big Island was the “newest” of all the Hawaiian Islands. While the coast of Kona has a desert-like climate, the weather at Sunshower Farms is a stark contrast. Fifteen minutes up into the mountains the mornings are sunny and in the 80s, afternoons are cloudy/rainy and in the 70s, and the nights get nice and cool, around the 60s, perfect sleeping weather. With the incredible weather and scenic views, it’s absolutely surreal being here.

The first couple of days we’ve done work in the morning which, so far, has entailed cleaning the bunny cage and chicken coup, trimming the dead leaves off the banana trees, and taking down a huge fence line for the soon-to-be coffee fields. This has left us the afternoon to explore some of the beaches. Below I’ve posted lots of pictures of where I’m staying, some of the chores we’ve done, and places we’ve visited.

Holohokai Beach

After the sea got the best of me at Hapuna, it was nice to put my chair under a little tree and read my book at Holoholokai Beach. You can’t really swim because there is too much rock; still, the rocky coastline dappled in white coral provides an incredible view. There are many little nooks and trees so it is quite easy to feel completely secluded in your own little nook. Holohokai Beach

After the sea got the best of me at Hapuna, it was nice to put my chair under a little tree and read my book at Holoholokai Beach. You can’t really swim because there is too much rock; still, the rocky coastline dappled in white coral provides an incredible view. There are many little nooks and trees so it is quite easy to feel completely secluded in your own little nook. Holohokai Beach

After the sea got the best of me at Hapuna, it was nice to put my chair under a little tree and read my book at Holoholokai Beach. You can’t really swim because there is too much rock; still, the rocky coastline dappled in white coral provides an incredible view. There are many little nooks and trees so it is quite easy to feel completely secluded in your own little nook. Holohokai Beach

After the sea got the best of me at Hapuna, it was nice to put my chair under a little tree and read my book at Holoholokai Beach. You can’t really swim because there is too much rock; still, the rocky coastline dappled in white coral provides an incredible view. There are many little nooks and trees so it is quite easy to feel completely secluded in your own little nook. Holohokai Beach

After the sea got the best of me at Hapuna, it was nice to put my chair under a little tree and read my book at Holoholokai Beach. You can’t really swim because there is too much rock; still, the rocky coastline dappled in white coral provides an incredible view. There are many little nooks and trees so it is quite easy to feel completely secluded in your own little nook.

Holohokai Beach

After the sea got the best of me at Hapuna, it was nice to put my chair under a little tree and read my book at Holoholokai Beach. You can’t really swim because there is too much rock; still, the rocky coastline dappled in white coral provides an incredible view. There are many little nooks and trees so it is quite easy to feel completely secluded in your own little nook.

Meet Joey & Sam, my fellow WWOOFers. Joey is from California and Sam is from New Mexico. This is when we went to Hapuna Beach. I dove under two huge waves but couldn’t keep up and the next two sent me tumbling in a sandy swirl to shore. The ocean won the battle this time but with two and a half months left, and lots of exploring to do, it won’t win the war. 



 




Meet Joey & Sam, my fellow WWOOFers. Joey is from California and Sam is from New Mexico. This is when we went to Hapuna Beach. I dove under two huge waves but couldn’t keep up and the next two sent me tumbling in a sandy swirl to shore. The ocean won the battle this time but with two and a half months left, and lots of exploring to do, it won’t win the war. 

Meet Joey & Sam, my fellow WWOOFers. Joey is from California and Sam is from New Mexico. This is when we went to Hapuna Beach. I dove under two huge waves but couldn’t keep up and the next two sent me tumbling in a sandy swirl to shore. The ocean won the battle this time but with two and a half months left, and lots of exploring to do, it won’t win the war. 

Keiki Ponds